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bolts Registered User


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Good investment books to read. bolts Aug 7th, 03, 10:07 PM #1

Here are the recommended books for the newbie investor.

Buffetology by Mary Buffet.
The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham.
One up on Wall Street by Peter Lynch.

These are books on the fundamental style of investing. TA and chartists will have to look elsewhere.


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Sky Registered User


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Sky Aug 17th, 03, 01:01 AM #2
any book that is more related to singapore ?
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bolts Registered User


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bolts Aug 17th, 03, 07:33 PM #3
Quote:
Originally posted by Sky
any book that is more related to singapore ?
Investing basics is the same, whether local or otherwise.
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blacklotus Aug 25th, 03, 01:04 AM #4
Quote:
Originally posted by Sky
any book that is more related to singapore ?
Investment info with local flavour
A NEW locally-written guide on stock investing has an edge over foreign books of its type: It is full of examples from the Singapore market.

Not only that, some of the examples come straight out of the personal investing experience of its author, Associate Professor Sebastian Chong, who specialises in finance and accounting at the National University of Singapore.

So while the principles of investing he describes may be familiar to seasoned investors, the self-published 226-page book, Value Investing, is fresh with Prof Chong's take on the recent ups and downs of stocks.

Using Nera Telecommunications, for example, he explains why an unusually low price-earnings (PE) ratio - a yardstick which relates the price to the earnings of a stock - can be deceptive.

On the other hand, he explains why Sincere Watch's equally low PE ratio of around seven times is a good reason to invest in the stock.

And he explains cash flow by relating how computer maker IPC fell from grace. Prof Chong sticks out his neck by offering a list of 34 stocks whose price could multiply 10 times within the next 10 years.

He says this is based partly on their financial track record but mostly on one factor which he considers paramount: the quality of their management. He does not say why he holds these managements in high esteem, so you may be surprised by some of his choices.

They include Venture Corporation, United Overseas Bank, Hyflux, Portek, HTL International, Norelco Centreline, Frontline Technologies, Boardroom, Thai Village, Surface Mount Technology and CSE Global. -- Leong Chan Teik

http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/mon...06316,00.html?

I myself will be checking this book out as well. Hmm...he picked Boardroom as well...Hope we're both right...
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Cheaper Business Books Stupidbear Nov 5th, 08, 06:21 PM #5
www.theonlinebookshop.blgospot.com

Do check this site out.
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bozo Nov 13th, 08, 07:21 PM #6
what do you guys think about "A random walk on wall street"?
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Stupidbear Nov 14th, 08, 11:52 AM #7
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Originally Posted by bozo View Post
what do you guys think about "A random walk on wall street"?
Supports the EMH theory, if i'm not wrong, which I don't really agree with.
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Dr_ARCHer Nov 14th, 08, 12:26 PM #8
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Originally Posted by Stupidbear View Post
Supports the EMH theory, if i'm not wrong, which I don't really agree with.
Which form? Weak, semi-strong or strong?

Anyway, the book is a good read as it describes the markets, with specific references to certain events. Personally, I find it a bit slow going.

My own preference is "A Non-random walk down Wall Street" though. This is a collection of academic papers written by Lo and MacKinlay focusing on the nuances of the market (based on transactional data). Not for the faint hearted though.
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desaturated Nov 14th, 08, 01:41 PM #9
Books thats is not recommended for newbie investor or perhaps any investors (but still can be read for the sake of entertainment and "maybe" some inspiration):

Any Robert Kiyosaki's book
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bozo
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bozo Nov 14th, 08, 04:31 PM #10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_ARCHer View Post
Which form? Weak, semi-strong or strong?

Anyway, the book is a good read as it describes the markets, with specific references to certain events. Personally, I find it a bit slow going.

My own preference is "A Non-random walk down Wall Street" though. This is a collection of academic papers written by Lo and MacKinlay focusing on the nuances of the market (based on transactional data). Not for the faint hearted though.

its a pretty good book imo, i think it tends towards semi strong EMH but i'm not entirely sure. agree with it being a tedious read though, but thats because he's treating readers as laymen i think.
The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. — Bertrand Russell
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